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Polish Folk Music *** Nursery Rhymes *** Folk Music Ensembles *** Muzyka Ludowa *** Biesiada - Gdybym miał gitarę
Polish Folk Music *** Nursery Rhymes *** Folk Music Ensembles *** Muzyka Ludowa *** Biesiada  
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Gdybym miał gitarę
Key of Am
INTRO:  Dm Am E Am A7 

Am E Am A7
Gdybym miał gitarę, to bym na niej grał
 Dm Am E Am A7
Opowiedziałbym o swej miłości, którą przeżyłem sam
 Dm Am E Am E Am
Opowiedziałbym o swej miłości, którą przeżyłem sam

REFRAIN:
 Am E Am A7
 A wszystko te czar - ne oczy, gdybym ja je miał
 Dm Am E Am A7
 Za te czarne, cudne oczęta serce dusze bym dał
 Dm Am E Am E Am
 Za te czarne, cudne oczęta serce dusze bym dał

Fajki ja nie palę, wódki nie piję
Ale z żalu, z żalu wielkiego ledwo co żyję
Ale z żalu, z żalu wielkiego ledwo co żyję

REFRAIN

Ludzie mówią głupi po cóż ty ją brał
Po coś to dziewcze czarne figlarne mocno pokochał
Po coś to dziewcze czarne figlarne mocno pokochał

 REFRAIN

A wszystko te czar - ne oczy, gdybym ja je miał
Za te czarne, cudne oczęta serce dusze bym dał
Za te czarne, cudne oczęta serce dusze bym dał



After having won 17 first prizes in competitions around the world between 1996-2004, Marcin Dylla won the Guitar Foundation of America’s International Competition in 2007. That award earned Dylla a 50-concert tour of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. His list of accolades also includes concerto competition victories, audience prizes, and critics' awards. 

Acclaimed Polish Guitarist Marcin Dylla
Born June 6, 1976, in Chorzów, Poland, Dylla began learning guitar at the age of 8 in the State School of Music in Ruda Śląska. Between 1995 and 2000, he studied at the Music Academy of Katowice with  Ms. Wanda Palacz. He continued his musical studies abroad at the Music Academy of Basel with Professor Oscar Ghiglia, at the Music Academy of Freiburg with Professor Sonja Prunnbauer and at the Music Academy of Maastricht with Carlo Marchione. Dylla was granted a Gold Guitar musical critics’ award for the best upcoming young guitar player at the 7th International Guitar Convent in Alexandria in 200

Marcin Dylla has recorded four CDs, including a Laureate Series-Guitar CD, “Guitar Recital” on the Naxos label, featuring compositions by Joaquin Rodrigo, Alexander Tansman, Nicholas Maw, and Manuel Ponce. This CD has won high praise from critics. Dylla frequently performs works by Rodriguez, but he has also devoted a CD to Polish guitar music, by composers such as Jerzy Bauer, Edmund Jurkowski, Feliks Horecki, and Jan Nepomucen de Bobrowicz. Dylla is accompanied by Marek Moś and the Aukso Chamber Orchestra on “Polish Guitar Music.



Marcin Dylla plays Rossiniana no.1 at Wawel Royal Castle
CLICK HERE to view Marcin Dylla classical guitar video.

My performance of "Gdybym miał gitarę" includes accordion, acoustic guitar and vocals.
CLICK HERE
to view the evergrowing master list of Polish folk songs on PoloniaMusic.com.

CLICK HERE
to enter 
Folk & World Music Store via the back door.

Traditional Polish Music
Polish folk music was collected in the 19th century by Oskar Kolberg, as part of a wave of Polish national revival. With the coming of the world wars and then the Communist state, folk traditions were oppressed or subsumed into state-approved folk ensembles. The most famous of the state ensembles are Mazowsze and Śląsk, both of which still perform. Though these bands had a regional touch to their output, the overall sound was a homogenized mixture of Polish styles. There were more authentic state-supported groups, such as Słowianki, but the Communist sanitized image of folk music made the whole field seem unhip to young audiences, and many traditions dwindled rapidly.

Polish dance music, especially the mazurka and polonaise, were popularized by Frederick Chopin, and they soon spread across Europe and elsewhere. These are triple time dances, while five-beat forms are more common in the northeast and duple-time dances like the krakowiak come from the south. The polonaise comes from the French word for Polish to identify its origin among the Polish aristocracy, who had adapted the dance from a slower walking dance called chodzony. The polonaise then re-entered the scene and became an integral part of Polish music.

Poland's five national dances
 (Mazur, Polonez, Kujawiak, Krakowiak, Oberek), as well as modern dance, contemporary dance and ballet are all widely performed today throughout the Polonia community.

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