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Dwanaście aniołków - Dwanaście listeczków - Polish Wedding Song
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Guitar Capo Position: 1st fret

C
Dwanaście listeczków
                          G7
 przy tej białej róży

 dwanaście aniołków dwanaście aniołków
                         C
 tobie dzisiaj sluży
 G7
 dwanaście aniołków dwanaście aniołków
                         C
 tobie dzisiaj sluży

Dałaś panu rączke
 ksiądz dał ci obrączke
 zalałaś sie łzami zalałaś się łzami
 przed jego oczami
 zalałaś sie łzami zalałaś się łzami
 przed jego oczami

O wianku wianeczku
 cały z róż utkany
 bardziej mi ciebie żal bardziej mi ciebie żal
 niż kochanej mamy
 bardziej mi ciebie żal bardziej mi ciebie żal
 niż kochanej mamy

Bo z mamą rodzoną
 nie będe sypiała
 tylko z tobą młody tylko z tobą młody
 bomci ślubowała
 tylko z tobą młody tylko z tobą młody
 bomci ślubowała  



Dwanaście aniołków (Dwanaście listeczków)
Twelve Angels Waltz


Key of D
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“Oczepiny” or “The Unveiling” is an old Polish wedding tradition. At the reception, the bride's veil is removed by her mother and transfered to the maid of honor and bridesmaids for good luck. 

During the unveiling, everyone forms a circle around the bride. Her mother removes the bride's veil and places it on the head of the maid of honor who then does a short dance with the best man. The veil is then passed along to the other bridesmaids, each representing one of the twelve angels. (Customs vary.)
Dwanaście aniołków is often played at Polish wedding receptions for the “Oczepiny” or “The Unveiling”
Traditionally, a babushka is placed on the the bride's head, usually by the mother-in-law, to symbolize the bride’s transition from young bride to married woman.



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Traditional Polish Music
Polish folk music was collected in the 19th century by Oskar Kolberg, as part of a wave of Polish national revival. With the coming of the world wars and then the Communist state, folk traditions were oppressed or subsumed into state-approved folk ensembles. The most famous of the state ensembles are Mazowsze and Śląsk, both of which still perform. Though these bands had a regional touch to their output, the overall sound was a homogenized mixture of Polish styles. There were more authentic state-supported groups, such as Słowianki, but the Communist sanitized image of folk music made the whole field seem unhip to young audiences, and many traditions dwindled rapidly.

Polish dance music, especially the mazurka and polonaise, were popularized by Frederick Chopin, and they soon spread across Europe and elsewhere. These are triple time dances, while five-beat forms are more common in the northeast and duple-time dances like the krakowiak come from the south. The polonaise comes from the French word for Polish to identify its origin among the Polish aristocracy, who had adapted the dance from a slower walking dance called chodzony. The polonaise then re-entered the scene and became an integral part of Polish music.

Poland's five national dances
 (Mazur, Polonez, Kujawiak, Krakowiak, Oberek), as well as modern dance, contemporary dance and ballet are all widely performed today throughout the Polonia community.

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